Top Ten of the Most Unique Books I’ve Read

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly book meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week, she posts an idea relating to books and encourages other book bloggers to respond with their own top ten lists.

This week’s topic is “top ten of the most unique books you’ve read.” Whether it’s in terms of plot, characterization, or narration, there were a lot of books that stood out when I was compiling this list. Here are just a few of them:

1. The Book Thief
Death is not exactly the most traditional choice of a narrator, however Markus Zusak pulls it off with aplomb. It’s such a beautiful yet heartbreaking read, and I often find myself wondering if it would have been as powerful if told from Liesel’s perspective.

2. Shadow and Bone
Ravka is such an intriguing world, steeped in Russian folklore, magic, and fantastic characters (like the Darkling). I haven’t read anything quite like this series, which helps place it even further up on my favourites list.

3. Shatter Me
Although I wasn’t a huge fan of this book, there’s  no denying that it’s very uniquely written. Littered with so many beautiful (and strange) similes, metaphors, and crossouts, Juliette’s thoughts are portrayed in a very interesting style.

4. Cinder
Cinder doesn’t fit the typical Cinderella story to a T and involves a lot of creative liberties, such as the inclusion of aliens and cyborgs, making for a very engaging fairytale retelling.

5. The Night Circus
This is such a beautiful, breathtaking, and magical read. The circus, the tents, the characters, and the plot are all so mesmerizing and different, making it one of my absolute favourite books.

6. Every Day
Every Day has both a unique premise and an unusual choice of narrator: every day, A wakes up in a different body – male, female, old, young, all are possibilities. A’s gender is never established, and it was strange talking about this book and not being able to refer to A as “him” or “her.”

7. Two Boys Kissing
Like Every Day, Two Boys Kissing has an unexpected narrator – this time, in the form of a Greek Chorus of gay men who have lost their lives to AIDS. The use of the inclusive “we” made the story that much more poignant, touching, and memorable.

8. The Knife of Never Letting Go
I didn’t expect to like this book (or series) as much as I did. The spelling and grammar varies between characters, giving them their own distinct voices – and, to further add to that, different fonts, sizes, and italics are used to distinguish between the Noise of the men from each town. The noise itself was such a neat inclusion, making for an unforgettable read.

9. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
The inclusion of found black and white photographs adds to the creepy atmosphere of this read. I’m also still not quite sure what to classify this as: supernatural horror, perhaps?

10. Angelfall
This book restored my faith in YA books that involve angels. A post-apocalyptic setting, cannibalism, angels that certainly aren’t cherubic, and a wonderful female lead make Angelfall a far cry from the “fallen angel falls in love with a human” story that I’ve read far too often.

+ Honourable Mentions
Because I’m awful and can’t choose just ten, here are a few of the others I would include: Harry Potter, The Archived, anything by Neil Gaiman, Good Omens, and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

What are some of the most unique books you’ve read? Leave me a list or a link to your list in the comments below.

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Top Ten Most Memorable Secondary Characters

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly book meme created and hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Every week she posts an idea for relating to books, and encourages other book bloggers to respond with their own “top ten” list.

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This week’s topic is “top ten most memorable secondary characters.” It was quite difficult for me to narrow this list down to just ten characters, since secondary characters are often just as intriguing as the main protagonists.

1. Rue (The Hunger Games)

Rue is sweet, adorable, and completely underestimated in the Games. She survived a lot longer than people expected her to, and her story impacted Katniss’ story in so many ways.

2. Finnick Odair (Catching Fire)

There’s a reason that the sugar cube scene in Catching Fire is remembered by most readers, but Finnick’s charming nature isn’t the only reason to love him. He’s loyal, brave, and strong, and his relationship with Annie is one of the sweetest things I’ve ever read.

3. Neville Longbottom (Harry Potter)

I loved watching Neville’s transformation from a scared, forgetful boy who was constantly bullied to a strong, incredibly important young man. This transformation starts in the first book, when he shows a great deal of bravery standing up to his friends, and continues until the end of the series.

4. Luna Lovegood (Harry Potter)

Luna is one of my favourite characters in the Harry Potter world. She’s quirky and slightly crazy, but she owns it and doesn’t let anyone’s negative opinions get her down. She’s so true to herself and comfortable in her own skin, and I admire her so much for that.

5. Manchee (The Knife of Never Letting Go)

I love talking animals in books, and Manchee reminded me so much of Dug the dog from Up! His relationship with Todd was heartwarming, and many of his thoughts made me laugh. His story made me cry so much, even though I realize that certain situations were necessary for Todd’s character growth.

6. Sturmhond (Siege and Storm)

Sturmhond is witty and charming, which made me instantly fall in love with him (and made me wish more than once that he was a real person). He’s also incredibly well composed, calculating, and adaptive, which are necessary qualities given his agenda.

7. Magnus Bane (The Mortal Instruments)

I love Magnus so much. He comes across as witty, charming, and entertaining, and his time as an immortal has given him many insights on what it means to live and to love. He’s easily the most interesting character in The Moral Instruments series, and I can’t wait to see where his story goes next!

8. Patrick (The Perks of Being a Wallflower)

Patrick is so much more than just comic relief; he broke my heart, made me laugh, and inspired me with his unfailing optimism. He goes through some tough times, but still manages to be the light that Charlie needs in his life, which Ezra Miller captured perfectly in the movie.

9. Isaac (The Fault in Our Stars)

I loved his friendship with Gus, and how he bridged the gap between Gus and Hazel. The fact that he was more concerned about how his girlfriend would take his blindness than the actual blindness itself speaks volumes about his character, as well.

10. Tiny Cooper (Will Grayson, Will Grayson)

Tiny was definitely my favourite character in this book, since his personality was just as large as his exterior. His musical was flawless, and he’s so much fun! I need to find myself a friend like him.

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Who are some of your favourite secondary characters? Leave me a link to your post or a list of your favourites in the comments below.
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30 Day Book Challenge: Day 7

I stumbled across this 30 day book challenge by The Chronicles of Radiya and decided to give it a try. Hopefully it will lead to 30 consecutive days of blogging that liven up the blog a bit and give us a chance to get to know each other a little better.

Day 7: Most Underrated Book

Prentisstown isn’t like other towns. Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in an overwhelming, never-ending stream of Noise. Just a month away from the birthday that will make him a man, Todd and his dog, Manchee — whose thoughts Todd can hear too, whether he wants to or not — stumble upon an area of complete silence. They find that in a town where privacy is impossible, something terrible has been hidden — a secret so awful that Todd and Manchee must run for their lives.

But how do you escape when your pursuers can hear your every thought?

I know that I already did a Saturday Showcase post about this series… but it’s just so good! Unfortunately, I haven’t heard much about the Chaos Walking series outside of the book blogging community – in fact, I had never even heard of Patrick Ness until a few months ago.

These are some of the best YA dystopian novels I’ve ever read. The writing style is unique, the characters are loveable, the animals can talk (through their thoughts, but still), and it addresses so many important themes. It’s such a powerful series, and will leave a lingering impression.

Saturday Showcase (August 3)

Saturday Showcase is a weekly event hosted here at The In-Between Place which features books that you wish more people had read (or, at least, heard about). This week’s featured books are the Chaos Walking series by Patrick Ness.

Prentisstown isn’t like other towns. Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in an overwhelming, never-ending stream of Noise. Just a month away from the birthday that will make him a man, Todd and his dog, Manchee — whose thoughts Todd can hear too, whether he wants to or not — stumble upon an area of complete silence. They find that in a town where privacy is impossible, something terrible has been hidden — a secret so awful that Todd and Manchee must run for their lives.

But how do you escape when your pursuers can hear your every thought?

These are some of the best YA dystopian novels I’ve ever read. The writing style is unique, the characters are loveable, the animals can talk (through their thoughts, but still), and it addresses so many important themes. It’s such a powerful series, and I highly, highly recommend it.

What are some of your favourite underrated books? Leave me a list or a link to your post in the comments below.
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WWW Wednesday (July 10)

WWW Wednesday is a weekly event hosted by Should Be Reading. To participate, answer the following three questions:
1. What are you currently reading?
2. What did you recently finish reading?
3. What do you think you’ll read next?

Here are my answers:

Currently Reading:
1I’m currently reading Gone by Michael Grant. It’s been on my to-read list for ages since I’ve heard good things about this series. I’m only about 100 pages in but so far I like it, even though the pace is kind of slow.

 

 

 

Recently Finished:

1I recently finished reading Eve by Anna Carey, which I unfortunately didn’t enjoy as much as I would have liked to. My review for it can be found here.

 

 

 

 

What I Think I’ll Read Next:

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When it comes to choosing a book to read next, I’m the worst at making a decision. I always have about 2980427384 books lying around at home that I’ve borrowed from the library or bought and haven’t read yet. I also have a bad habit of requesting a ton of books on Netgalley at a time, downloading them, and then forgetting about them – though I’ve told myself that I’m not allowed to request anything else until I’m completely caught up, so we’ll see how well I can stick to that.

That being said, I think that my next read will either be You Are Mine by Janeal Falor (which was a review request, so it should really be my first priority) or The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness (which is due back at the library soon).

Feel free to share your answers or a link to your own WWW post in the comments below; I’d love to see what you’re reading! : )
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